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Agronomic Evaluation of Prospective New Crop Species III. Crepis alpina: Source of Crepenynic Acid

G. A. White, B. C. Willingham and Wheeler Calhoun
Economic Botany
Vol. 27, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1973), pp. 320-322
Published by: Springer on behalf of New York Botanical Garden Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4253429
Page Count: 3
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Agronomic Evaluation of Prospective New Crop Species III. Crepis alpina: Source of Crepenynic Acid
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Abstract

A single accession of Crepis alpina, P.I. 326551 from Turkey, showed good agronomic potential for crop development. The seed oil contains more than 70 percent crepenynic acid. Seed retention and plant habit are excellent. Seed yields ranged from 117 to 1,800 kg/ha. Spring and fall plantings were successful at several locations. Fall plantings may be preferred because of earlier maturity. Since early seedling development is slow, weed competition may be severe. Direct combining should be feasible, but threshing problems might arise because of the small, long-beaked seed. Improvements in yield and other agronomic characteristics should be possible through breeding. More germ plasm would provide a broader base of plant variability.

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