Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Relationships between Stomatal Behavior and Internal Carbon Dioxide Concentration in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants

William Cockburn, Irwin P. Ting and Leonel O. Sternberg
Plant Physiology
Vol. 63, No. 6 (Jun., 1979), pp. 1029-1032
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4265790
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Relationships between Stomatal Behavior and Internal Carbon Dioxide Concentration in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants
Preview not available

Abstract

Measurements of internal gas phase CO2 concentration, stomatal resistance, and acid content were made in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants growing under natural conditions. High CO2 concentrations, sometimes in excess of 2%, were observed during the day in a range of taxonomically widely separated plants (Opuntia ficus-indica L., Opuntia basilaris Engelm. and Bigel., Agave desertii Engelm., Yucca schidigera Roezl. ex Ortiges, Ananas comosus [L.] Merr., Aloe vera L., Cattleya sp. and Phalanopsis sp.) and below ambient air concentrations were observed at night. Stomatal resistance was always high when CO2 concentration was high and experiments in which attempts were made to manipulate internal CO2 concentrations gave data consistent with stomatal behavior in Crassulacean acid metabolism being controlled by internal CO2 concentration. Exogenous CO2 applied in darkness at a concentration similar to those observed in the light caused stomatal resistance to increase. In pads of Opuntia basilaris Engelm. and Bigel. subjected to severe water stress internal gas phase CO2 concentrations exhibited fluctuations opposite in phase to fluctuations in acid content. Stomatal resistance remained high and the opening response to low CO2 concentration was almost entirely eliminated.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1029
    1029
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1030
    1030
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1031
    1031
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1032
    1032