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Journal Article

Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Imbibing Soybean Seeds in Relation to Deterioration

Lowell W. Woodstock and Raymond B. Taylorson
Plant Physiology
Vol. 67, No. 3 (Mar., 1981), pp. 424-428
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/4266660
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Imbibing Soybean Seeds in Relation to Deterioration
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Abstract

Deterioration as evidenced by decline in germination or seedling growth of soybean (cv. Essex) seeds during accelerated aging treatments at 41 C and 100% relative humidity is accompanied by increased levels of acetaldehyde and ethanol in imbibing embryonic axes and seeds. These increases become more pronounced with duration of the aging treatment. A similar inverse relationship between levels of acetaldehyde and ethanol and deterioration was observed when seeds were "naturally" aged for several years. During imbibition of low-vigor, accelerated-aged seeds at 25 C, acetaldehyde and ethanol increased from near trace amounts in dry tissues to maximum levels at 4 hours. Increases in acetaldehyde and ethanol during imbibition were less in high- than in low-vigor seeds. Increases were also less pronounced in low-vigor seeds when water uptake injury was avoided by osmotically decreasing water uptake rate with 30% polyethylene glycol. Embryonic axes from deteriorated seeds were characterized by low rates of O2 uptake and high respiratory quotients relative to the unaged controls. Anaerobic conditions and respiratory inhibitors, such as sodium azide, increased acetaldehyde and ethanol in unaged seeds to levels similar to those in accelerated-aged seeds after 2 hours imbibition. It is suggested that, during aging, an imbalance between tricarboxylic and glycolytic activities, present during early imbibition to some degree even in vigorous unaged seeds, becomes more pronounced and leads to accumulation of ethanol and acetaldehyde.

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