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Shivaji's Myth and Maharashtra's Syncretic Traditions

J. J. Roy Burman
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 36, No. 14/15 (Apr. 14-20, 2001), pp. 1226-1234
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4410485
Page Count: 9
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Shivaji's Myth and Maharashtra's Syncretic Traditions
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Abstract

Despite fears of increasing communalisation in public life and the attempt to portray Shivaji as a 'Hindu' raja, long-standing syncretic traditions observed by followers of different communities, from diverse caste backgrounds continue to flourish till date across Maharashtra. As borne out by several case studies cited in this article, Hindus and Muslims frequent dargahs, mazars and chillahs, and there are instances of temples in the Konkan region drawing followers of Islam. There are also shrines and sacred sites that possess a dual identity - they are both a dargah and a temple at the same time; deities bear both Hindu and Islamic names and priests of both communities officiate at ceremonies.

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