Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Selective Forces Affecting the Predator Alarm Calls of Vervet Monkeys

Dorothy L. Cheney and Robert M. Seyfarth
Behaviour
Vol. 76, No. 1/2 (1981), pp. 25-61
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4534091
Page Count: 37
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Selective Forces Affecting the Predator Alarm Calls of Vervet Monkeys
Preview not available

Abstract

Vervet monkeys in Amboseli National Park, Kenya are preyed upon by four types of predator: mammalian carnivores, eagles, baboons, and snakes. Over a 14 month period, adult males and females gave first alarm calls at comparable rates. Both observation on the frequency of alarm-calling and experiments on the duration of alarm-calling indicated that high-ranking adult males and females gave alarm calls more often than low-ranking adult males and females. Individuals who alarm-called most often did not vocalize most often during social interactions, nor did they spend more time than others surveying the habitat around them. There was some tendency, however, for females who alarm-called most often to precede other females in group progressions. Limited evidence suggests that adult males who gave most alarm calls were more likely than other males to have fathered the group's juveniles and infants. Among adult females, however, there was no correlation between number of offspring and frequency of first alarm calls. Females who gave alarm calls most often were not more likely than other females to spend large proportions of observation time more than 2 m from their offspring. Data on a small sample of confirmed predatory attacks suggest that the offspring of high-ranking females may have been more vulnerable than other immatures to predation. Such differential vulnerability may have resulted in part from the tendency of the offspring of high-ranking females to precede other juveniles in group progressions. Vervets of all age/sex classes alarm-called most at those species of predators to which they themselves seemed to be most vulnerable. Adult vervets gave relatively few alarm calls to predators to which their offspring, but not themselves, were vulnerable, even though such alarm calls would have been of low cost to themselves and of great potential benefit to their offspring. While some aspects of the alarm-calling behavior of vervet monkeys are consistent with the hypothesis that their alarms have evolved to benefit kin, in other respects their alarms appear to have the consequence of benefitting only the alarmists themselves. It is likely that both kin and individual selection, acting on an individual's inclusive fitness, have played a role in the evolution of vervet monkeys' alarm calls. /// Les vervets dans l'Amboseli National Park, Kenya sont la proie des bêtes de quatre types: les carnassiers, mammifères les aigles, les babouins, et les serpents. Pendant une période de quatorze mois, les mâles adultes et les femelles adultes ont donné les cris d'alarme à un taux similaire. L'observation et l'expérimentation ont montré que les mâles et les femelles adultes de rang élevé ont donné les cris d'alarme plus souvent que les males et les femelles de rang bas. Les individus qui donnaient les cris d'alarme fréquemment (a) n'ont pas crié plus que d'autres vervets pendant les interactions sociaux, et (b) n'ont pas dépensé plus de temps que d'autres en guettant les alentours. Cependant, les femelles qui donnaient les cris d'alarme fréquemment ont souvent précédé les autres dans la progression du groupe. Il y a une évidence limitée que les mâles adultes qui donnaient les cris d'alarme le plus souvent étaient, avec plus de probabilité que les autres mâles, les pères des juvéniles et des enfants du groupe. Cependant, parmi les femelles adultes, il n'y a pas de corrélation positive entre le nombre des enfants et la fréquence des cris d'alarme. Les femelles qui donnaient les cris d'alarme le plus souvent ne passaient pas plus de temps éloignées de leurs enfants que d'autres femelles. Néanmoins, les observations de neuf attaques rapaces ont suggéré que les enfants des femelles de rang élevé furent plus susceptibles que d'autres, ceci probablement parce qu'ils précédaient les autres enfants dans le groupe. Chaque vervet a donné les cris d'alarme le plus souvent a l'espèce de bête qui était le plus vulnerable pour lui-même. Les vervets adultes ont donné peu des cris aux bêtes dangereux pour leurs enfants, mais pas pour eux-mêmes. Pourtant, tels cris eurent coûtés peu à eux-mêmes et pourraient être très avantageux pour leurs enfants. Quoique certains aspects du fonctionnement des cris d'alarme des vervets viennent à l'appui de l'hypothèse que leurs cris ont évolué à l'avantage des parentés, à d'autres égards leurs cris se montrent conférer l'avantage seulement aux alarmistes eux-même. Il est possible que le "kin selection" et le "individual selection", en agissant tous les deux sur le "inclusive fitness", ont été importants pour l'évolution des cris d'alarme des vervets.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[25]
    [25]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61