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The Hamzat al-Waṣl in Contemporary Modern Standard Arabic

Alan S. Kaye
Journal of the American Oriental Society
Vol. 111, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1991), pp. 572-574
DOI: 10.2307/604273
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/604273
Page Count: 3
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The Hamzat al-Waṣl in Contemporary Modern Standard Arabic
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Abstract

Contemporary Modern Standard Arabic has a good illustration of linguistic change in progress. The glottal stop in the word ʾism 'name, noun' has shifted to a hamzat al-qaṭʿ (cf. Classical Arabic ʾism, the glottal stop of which is a hamzat al-waṣl) both in allugha al-wusṭa, or Educated Standard Spoken Arabic, and in Modern Written Arabic. The main reason for this linguistic change is Systemzwang.

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