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Journal Article

Promoting Independence in Integrated Classrooms by Teaching Aides to use Activity Schedules and Decreased Prompts

Laura J. Hall, Lynn E. McClannahan and Patricia J. Krantz
Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
Vol. 30, No. 3 (September 1995), pp. 208-217
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23889172
Page Count: 10
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Promoting Independence in Integrated Classrooms by Teaching Aides to use Activity Schedules and Decreased Prompts
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Abstract

This study assessed a strategy to promote independent engagement in selected activities for children with disabilities in three integrated public school classrooms. A nonconcurrent multiple-baseline design, replicated across two aide-child pairs, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a sequence of instructions about prompt reduction for integration aides and the use of photographic activity schedules on aides' prompting and children's engagement. During intervention, there was an increase in independent engagement for all children. Instructional sessions, reminders to reduce prompts, and an instruction to use physical prompts only, resulted in low levels of prompts by all integration aides. On a brief questionnaire, all aides expressed their satisfaction with the program. These findings have important implications for staff training in public school settings, and for promoting the independence of children in integrated classrooms.

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